www.bluetruck.tv

The Blue Truck Blog Site


Leave a comment

Visual Story Telling—Why a Picture Really Is Worth a Thousand Words

Yes, a picture speaks a thousand words, but "action" speaks even louder.

Yes, a picture speaks a thousand words,
but “action” speaks even louder.

What’s your story? We all have had events and relationships in our lives that helped shape who we are today. Our personal stories connect us to others, provide context and affect how others perceive us.

We call it our reputation—and a good reputation is golden.

The same is true for companies. By sharing your corporate stories, you are opening the heart of your organization for others to see. This kind of storytelling presents valuable opportunities to connect with your existing customers and harvest new relationships.

While it may be hard to decipher a company’s storylines, every business has a wealth of stories to share.

Each organization began somewhere with someone who believed in a product or service. Your story includes where you are as a company today and where you’ve been. It can include anything from philanthropic efforts to the challenges your organization has faced and overcome.

Cutting through the clutter

While there are many mediums a company can use to tell its story, how do you cut through the clutter in a culture inundated with information and sensory overload? People are more likely to be drawn to a video that captures their attention and engages them versus words on a page.

Remember, 72 percent of consumers are more likely to buy or use a product or service when a video is present.* The take away? When you use visual storytelling, you increase audience, and that can increase your bottom line.

How does visual storytelling work to connect you with customers?

Visual storytelling puts a face to your company. No matter how large the company, you can connect individually with customers through your story, finding a way to strike a chord that causes them to pay attention to your message.

Video shows that you do more than just make X widget or offer Y service. It makes your brand more human. It helps buyers develop a personal connection to your company. Video makes a consumer more likely to be invested in your brand and compelled to search for and choose your product or service – even over less expensive brands.

Telling your story visually also can be a big help in the event you suddenly are faced with a crisis. It’s something we don’t like to think about, but corporate crises can and do happen. When something goes wrong, the true character of a company is revealed in the how the issue is resolved. Visual storytelling can be an effective way to communicate and reposition a brand out of tough situations and back into the hearts of your customers.

Fueling your business

Want to make your business take off? Then fuel up on high-octane marketing with visual story telling. Video adds more horsepower to your business engine, so you can pass up your competitors and drive home your message in a unique and engaging way.

Learn how visual storytelling can make your company stand apart from the others in next month’s blog.

About the Author:

Kristin A. Pelletier is an award-winning writer and executive producer with more than 20-years of experience in script-to-air television production and is the president of Blue Truck Media, Inc. Blue Truck specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.

Reference:
Stelzner, M. (2014) Visual Storytelling: How to Use Visuals, Videos and Social Media to Market Your Business. Social Media Examiner. Retrieved May 5, 2014 from http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/visual-storytelling-with-ekaterina-walter/

 


1 Comment

Video Production Budget (Part 2): Get the biggest bang for your production buck.

money_filmPart Two: The Lean Production Philosophy

You’ve decided that a product video is exactly what your company needs. You’ve found the right independent production company to help with the project. Now what?

If budget is a concern—and when isn’t it?— there are ways to lower your overall costs and get the most bang for your production bucks.

Rule No. 1 (there’s not a Rule No. 2, but this is important—pay attention): No matter who you hire to write and produce your content—and even if you self-produce your programming—don’t try to save money by “under producing.” This is a case where more is definitely better!

In corporate production, while it may seem counterintuitive, producing more can actually cost less. I always recommend to my clients producing (or at least filming) with more than one end product in mind. It is simply more efficient in the long run.

When a customer comes to me with a video project in mind, I always consider what other content might be useful. Not because I want to sell the client more production. I want to add value. “Added value” and “lean production” are business philosophies that were engrained in me as a young producer working for an independent a business television network.

One of my mentors instilled this idea in all his producers. He even wrote a handbook: The Lean Production Handbook, a guideline which outlined the most cost-effective ways to produce quality content and add value to every shoot. Among the time and money saving tips, we were encouraged to collect “bonus footage,” shoot “evergreen stock” and think of ways to “repurpose content.” These philosophies help me bring added value to the clients I serve today.

As a production manager and content developer, one of the first things I suggest to clients is to create a “programming wish list.”  We brainstorm a list of all the video programming that would possibly be needed or benefit the company over the next one to two years.

We consider content for marketing, sales, training and human resources. We note milestones, new product development and anniversaries so that we can take advantage of key marketing opportunities.

We discuss any inefficiency or pain the organization may be experiencing. Often we discover video solutions that can solve key issues, save valuable time or impart meaningful content.

In fact, some content can even provide a level of protection from potential lawsuits (a topic for another time.) Once we have the “wish list,” we prioritize the content, noting which videos will bring the most value to the organization.

Taking note of the big picture allows us to maximize production and to be forward thinking in planning and filming so we acquire footage not only for content at hand but also footage that may be relevant in future programming.

By carefully planning production, we are able to acquire bonus footage and clients are able to amortize their production budget over several video products. Maybe most important, we get ahead of the distribution game by developing a pipeline of content that can be edited and disseminated over time across various distribution channels. This approach saves corporations time and money and helps position them ahead of the competition.

Besides looking at video assets simply as video assets, I encourage clients to consider the other ways these assets can be used. For example, still shots captured from video can be used on social media channels and in print materials. Transcripts of interviews may appear in magazine articles and newsletters. Customer sound bytes could be included in radio commercials or appear as written testimonials in collateral materials.

In this way, video production becomes even more cost-effective because the content serves multiple purposes.

Keep this “Lean Production” philosophy top of mind as you contemplate video content. Big-picture planning and repurposing video assets helps corporations stretch their marketing dollars and get the biggest bang for their production buck.

About the Author:

Kristin A. Pelletier is an award-winning writer and executive producer with more than 20-years of experience in script-to-air television production and is the president of Blue Truck Media, Inc. Blue Truck specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.