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Blue Truck Productions Recruited to Market Emergent Services, LLC

Emergent Services, LLC, a company focused on helping veterans use their military skills and education in the insurance claims industry, is partnering with Kristin Pelletier, president of Blue Truck Media, Inc., to tell its unique story.

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL, (August 3, 2016)Kristin A. Pelletier, president of Blue Truck Media, Inc., announced today her company has been hired to provide writing and creative services for Emergent Services, LLC.

Blue Truck specializes in creating original content for entertainment and corporate clients worldwide. The media company’s production division, Blue Truck Productions offers turnkey marketing and production services including script and copy writing, storyboarding, producing, directing, filming, graphics design and editing.

Founded by disabled veteran Jason Waller of Sherman, Texas, Emergent Services is an independent claims adjusting firm specializing in catastrophic, residential, commercial, auto and flood claims. His company focuses on recruiting, training and hiring military veterans as independent claims adjusters because he knows first-hand that military veterans are well suited to the career.

Waller’s goal is for Emergent Services to become a preferred source of independent claims adjusters for insurance companies, giving military veterans who are small business owners the ability to support their families, and the opportunity to contribute to their local economies and play an active role in their communities. He created the 5-to-500 Campaign, to help him grow the company by reaching out to Insurance companies who recognize the difficulties that military veterans face in transitioning into today’s job market, and agree that military veterans are well suited to represent companies to their policyholders after a catastrophic weather event.

Emergent Services has engaged Blue Truck Productions to consult on brand messaging and develop corporate marketing materials. Blue truck will provide creative direction, editing and copy writing services for the company’s website, including scriptwriting and creating the storyboard for their online introductory marketing video.

“We are so pleased and excited to be asked to support Jason in his efforts,” said Pelletier. “He has such a great story to tell about his own military experiences and a mission to help veterans successfully transition back to civilian life after military service. We are honored to be a part of this mission and team. Our goal is to capture and portray the essence of Jason, his company and the role veterans will serve in the insurance industry.”

Emergent Services’ founder and president Jason Waller said, “Partnering with Kristin and Blue Truck was a great decision on our part. She understands the challenges a start-up company faces and has focused her creative talents on helping us to hone our messaging, build our brand and tell our unique story through web content, a video and other materials to market Emergent Services.”

“Because this is a start-up company with limited resources, we are keeping the cost of the video to a minimum, using an exciting and unique combination of still photography and vector graphics to create a dynamic animated video that introduces the world to Emergent Services,” Pelletier explained. “Stay tuned. Emergent Services is a remarkable new company with a worthy and inspiring mission.”

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Blue Truck Media, Inc. based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.

 


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Blue Truck Productions’ President Joins Winterfest Advisory Board

Kristin A. Pelletier, president of Blue Truck Productions in Fort Lauderdale, has been named to the Advisory Board for Winterfest, which produces the iconic Seminole Hard Rock Winterfest Boat Parade. In her advisory capacity, Pelletier will serve as a consultant in helping the organization build awareness through video marketing and social media strategies.

Pelletier has been associated with Winterfest as a volunteer since relocating to Fort Lauderdale in 2012. Over the years, Blue Truck Productions has donated creative and production services to the organization and their premier fundraiser, the Black Tie Ball – an impressive formal event held yearly in December. The theme for this year’s party is “Cabaret” and takes place Friday, Dec. 3, 2016.

“I’m excited to be a member of the Winterfest Advisory Board, especially as the organization celebrates its 45th anniversary,” said Pelletier. “The annual Winterfest citywide activities, parties and events culminate with the lavish holiday-themed boat parade that’s on level with Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Only in this parade, the floats are boats and yachts of all sizes and its procession is along the Intracoastal Waterway in Fort Lauderdale. It is a beautiful holiday tradition and one of the reasons I love this community. Attending the parade should be on everyone’s bucket list. It really is the greatest show on H20!”

Pelletier is an award-winning writer and producer with more than 25 years of experience in marketing and television production. Blue Truck Media, Inc. founded in 2013, specializes in the creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books and offers turnkey production services to corporations around the world.

Winterfest is a 45-year-old Florida not-for-profit organization that produces “one of the top three parades in the South Florida market,” according to BizBash, and has earned the title “Top 100 Events for 2016.” To choose and rank the annual events on this list, BizBash considers several factors, including economic impact, buzz, innovation, and an event’s prominence within the communities it serves.

Winterfest’s estimated economic impact on the community is more than $50 million per year. Pelletier will support the organization’s goal of encouraging community connection while celebrating the year-round boating paradise of South Florida. This year’s parade theme is “Comics & Cartoons Rockin’ The Night Away,” bringing Superheroes and Showboats together to create a magical evening Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016.

 

Blue Truck Media, Inc. specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.


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Serving Up Fresh Content in the Restaurant Industry

Serving Up Fresh Content in the Restaurant Industry

Here’s a great question that recently made my radar detector go off.

“I am curious about what ideas you can present in order to help us increase our restaurant business?”

So glad they asked! Here’s what I told them.

There are a lot of options that can help increase exposure/drive customer awareness in any business. In that regard, restaurants are no different. But unlike many businesses that have online access, for a restaurant campaign to work, the customer must be motivated to jump in their jalopy (or a shiny, Blue Truck) and physically seek out the place of business.

Driving the Customer to Your Business

What drives the customer to take that action? A gangbuster campaign that includes a hefty serving of video content is a prime motivator! If the product is good (they LOVED the menu!), you’ll have repeat customers who’ll also help drive new customers through your front doors.

So let’s talk about what makes great video content that boosts your search engine optimization (SEO) to the top of the page, builds brand awareness and drives consumer interest and engagement.

Using Video to Boost Your SEO

Producing, curating (obtaining/licensing from outside sources), sharing and uploading video content is an excellent way to boost SEO. (More on how to curate video in a later blog.) As the saying goes, “Content is king.”

Statistics indicate that a video message is more likely to be viewed, shared and remembered by the viewer—and also increase your brand’s value and trust factor. Plus, video is a highly effective form of communication that provides a great reason to reach out to existing and new customers via social media (“Check out our video/commercial, etc.”). We call it the “soft serve” approach. You can even see how well you’re communicating using venues such as YouTube and Facebook, which have built in tracking and reporting mechanisms that allow you to see the results of your campaign.

Besides social media and website distribution, you may want to consider a commercial for cable broadcast or online paid advertising placement. There are many unique opportunities in today’s media-rich environment. One of our clients even places their commercials in movie theaters. While waiting for the movie to begin, moviegoers can munch on popcorn and get a heaping helping of your message at the same time. If you are investing marketing dollars in broadcast-quality video production, you can get the most bang for your buck by exploiting all distribution avenues. (To learn more, read my blogs about getting the most bang for your production buck, part 1 and part 2.)

Video content for your restaurant (or any business) may be anything from a commercial spot to behind-the-scenes vignettes (i.e. meet the staff/chef; learn or share a cocktail/food recipe; customer testimonials etc.). You can use video marketing to promote events or specials, which could be designed around your slower times, days or seasons. Who can resist the chef’s preparation and presentation of a mouth-watering menu item that tastes as good as it looks? Not me!

There’s another natural benefit of featuring your staff, products and customers in video—it goes a long way toward personalizing your brand. Putting faces and personalities to the name puts the “social” in social media.

Get the Customers Involved!

Besides the end product – the master video in hand – the process of creating a short film for your company can become a newsworthy topic to your audience. It gives you something exciting to tweet about, and opportunities to engage your audience. At Blue Truck Productions we help clients build a whole social media campaign around the pre- and post- production process.

For instance, in pre-production, we may hold a casting call for a customer to “star” in your commercial. Let’s make it a contest and get customers psyched and engaged. Ask them to submit a “video audition” and voila we’ve just curated more shareable content with a trail leading back to your company. A recipe for SEO success.

During production building up to the video’s release, we can share behind-the-scenes photographs, clips and production updates. And in post-production, we may cut two versions of the commercial and ask people to vote on their favorite. Get the picture? The ideas are endless–a veritable buffet of options!

I often consult with clients to build video production campaigns that may include a variety of professionally produced videos coupled with in-house content (which I help design/train staff to produce) and curated content. It’s just one of many services Blue Truck Productions offers its clients.

Let me know if I can help you in this way.

In the meantime, check out my Blog for information about using video in business, SEO, budgeting and more. There’s lot of good stuff in the blog archives with lots of new content heading your way. Subscribe at https://bluetrucktv.wordpress.com/.

Kind regards,

Kristin

About the Author:

Kristin A. Pelletier is an award-winning writer and executive producer with more then 20-years of experience in script-to-air television production and is the president of Blue Truck Media, Inc. Blue Truck specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.

 


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Video Production Budget (Part 2): Get the biggest bang for your production buck.

money_filmPart Two: The Lean Production Philosophy

You’ve decided that a product video is exactly what your company needs. You’ve found the right independent production company to help with the project. Now what?

If budget is a concern—and when isn’t it?— there are ways to lower your overall costs and get the most bang for your production bucks.

Rule No. 1 (there’s not a Rule No. 2, but this is important—pay attention): No matter who you hire to write and produce your content—and even if you self-produce your programming—don’t try to save money by “under producing.” This is a case where more is definitely better!

In corporate production, while it may seem counterintuitive, producing more can actually cost less. I always recommend to my clients producing (or at least filming) with more than one end product in mind. It is simply more efficient in the long run.

When a customer comes to me with a video project in mind, I always consider what other content might be useful. Not because I want to sell the client more production. I want to add value. “Added value” and “lean production” are business philosophies that were engrained in me as a young producer working for an independent a business television network.

One of my mentors instilled this idea in all his producers. He even wrote a handbook: The Lean Production Handbook, a guideline which outlined the most cost-effective ways to produce quality content and add value to every shoot. Among the time and money saving tips, we were encouraged to collect “bonus footage,” shoot “evergreen stock” and think of ways to “repurpose content.” These philosophies help me bring added value to the clients I serve today.

As a production manager and content developer, one of the first things I suggest to clients is to create a “programming wish list.”  We brainstorm a list of all the video programming that would possibly be needed or benefit the company over the next one to two years.

We consider content for marketing, sales, training and human resources. We note milestones, new product development and anniversaries so that we can take advantage of key marketing opportunities.

We discuss any inefficiency or pain the organization may be experiencing. Often we discover video solutions that can solve key issues, save valuable time or impart meaningful content.

In fact, some content can even provide a level of protection from potential lawsuits (a topic for another time.) Once we have the “wish list,” we prioritize the content, noting which videos will bring the most value to the organization.

Taking note of the big picture allows us to maximize production and to be forward thinking in planning and filming so we acquire footage not only for content at hand but also footage that may be relevant in future programming.

By carefully planning production, we are able to acquire bonus footage and clients are able to amortize their production budget over several video products. Maybe most important, we get ahead of the distribution game by developing a pipeline of content that can be edited and disseminated over time across various distribution channels. This approach saves corporations time and money and helps position them ahead of the competition.

Besides looking at video assets simply as video assets, I encourage clients to consider the other ways these assets can be used. For example, still shots captured from video can be used on social media channels and in print materials. Transcripts of interviews may appear in magazine articles and newsletters. Customer sound bytes could be included in radio commercials or appear as written testimonials in collateral materials.

In this way, video production becomes even more cost-effective because the content serves multiple purposes.

Keep this “Lean Production” philosophy top of mind as you contemplate video content. Big-picture planning and repurposing video assets helps corporations stretch their marketing dollars and get the biggest bang for their production buck.

About the Author:

Kristin A. Pelletier is an award-winning writer and executive producer with more than 20-years of experience in script-to-air television production and is the president of Blue Truck Media, Inc. Blue Truck specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.

 

 

 


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Video Production Budget: Get the biggest bang for your production buck.

 

movie-money-film-reel.ju_.09Part One: Time is Money

There is a plethora of research touting the benefits, value and trend toward video marketing. Marketers are churning out online video content at an unprecedented rate.

According to EMarketer, online video was the fastest growing ad format in 2012 with a nearly 55 percent growth rate1. Still, some marketers are struggling to develop quality video content, stating time and cost as the most common barriers.

It is true that writing, shooting and editing quality video programming requires a lot of time, but the effort pays off. According to MediaPost, 57 percent of consumers say that product videos make them more confident in a purchase and less likely to return an item2. So producing video content can be time and money well spent. But here’s the caveat: Be mindful of how you approach production–or you risk wasting both.

In effort to save money, companies often attempt to take production into their own hands, only to be frustrated with the results, or—more likely—lack of results.  Unless there is a dedicated, in-house production team or at least a project manager with production expertise, the clock may tick ever so slowly and often the end product suffers.

The good news is there’s an easy solution that will get your project done in a timely manner. Hire a professional.

Production is truly an area where outsourcing to an expert pays dividends. Besides freeing you up to conquer other tasks, hiring an outside contractor provides a fresh perspective and an objective eye on your products and services.

As an independent producer with full-service production capabilities, I travel all over the world to help corporations produce broadcast-quality programming, often becoming an integral part of their marketing team. I have worked with some clients for well over a decade. Why? My clients say they enjoy working with our team because they can trust us to work in autonomy to delivery a turn-key product on time and within budget.

They’ve discovered through trial and error that they really can’t achieve the same quality results faster, better or cheaper on their own (or through their agency of record, which typically outsources production and marks it up at cost plus a hefty agency charge).

So what’s the best approach to procure a high-quality, well-produced, cost-effective production with added value? A good way to start is by talking to an independent producer – whether it’s me or someone else – about your needs, budget and timeline.

An independent producer, can help you determine your production needs, then work with you to meet your budget and timeline—delivering a high-quality finished product for your company. And with careful planning, can help you save on future project costs—bringing added value to your company.

With a pipeline of fresh video content, your company’s investment in production will pay dividends to your bottom line.

About the Author:

Kristin A. Pelletier is an award-winning writer and executive producer with more then 20-years of experience in script-to-air television production and is the president of Blue Truck Media, Inc. Blue Truck specializes in the writing and creative development of original screenplays, television programming and books, and offers customized marketing and video production services to corporations, worldwide.

Next Month: Part Two, “The Lean Production Philosophy.”
Sources:
 1EMarketer (2012). Video Top Asset Created for Content Marketing. Retrieved May 8, 2014 from http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Video-Top-Asset-Created-Content-Marketing/1008927
 2MediaPost (2013). 57% of Consumers Rely on Product Videos by Daisy Whitney. Retrieved May 7, 2014 from http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/196791/57-of-consumers-rely-on-product-videos.html#axzz2OmAzPtJQ


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The Gift of Giving

Giving is good for the heart and soul.

I am the proverbial “Polly Anna.”  My glass is always half full.  I see the silver lining in every cloud.  However, a few years ago, I encountered a season of very gloomy, gray clouds. We all go through seasons of sorrow, but the stressors of life were weighing more heavily than ever.  I began to find it very difficult to keep my chin up.  In fact, I was feeling depressed.

I have always subscribed to the belief that through prayer, exercise, counseling and healthy living that one can overcome any obstacle.  However, the weight of sorrow I was feeling was not responding to a holistic approach to physical and mental wellness.  I found it increasingly difficult to put on a happy face, and put one foot in front of the other. Something was missing.  Then life gave me a gift in the form of a conversation with a friend.

Over coffee, my friend Rod was talking about the joy he experiences in volunteering. A sound byte from the conversation resonated in my soul. “The best way to feel good is to make other people feel good.”  Rod claimed that finding ways to serve others, volunteering and doing good deeds is the best way to increase joy in your life.   I took his words to heart. 

I began to look for more ways to serve and give.  I volunteered at more events.  I secretly placed flowers on stranger’s doorsteps.   I responded to the charity mailers. I left small gifts for people to find.  I covertly mowed my neighbor’s lawn.  I visited with elderly people.  I took dinner to a friend.  The giving feeling was addictive.  I began performing random acts of kindness at every opportunity I could find.  My blue feelings rapidly faded.  I suddenly felt happy again, even elated. 

Being the analytical type, I had to know: Was I simply caught up in the cliché: It is better to give than receive? Or, was there scientific evidence that something biological was happening to me?  So, I did what every good researcher does, I Googled it and found numerous research studies.  The feel good feeling I was feeling from giving was actually related to a release of endorphins – the feel good hormones – in my body.

When it comes to giving, I had always been told that you shouldn’t expect anything in return. That couldn’t be further from the truth.  By giving, I was not only creating joy in my life and the lives of others, I was actually improving my health and well-being. The act of giving was having a positive chemical reaction within the cells of my body; similar to the benefits of exercise.

Yet this key health discovery hasn’t made it fully into mainstream thinking.  Like exercise, it may take some time for everyone to adopt “the act of giving” as integral part of a holistic approach to health and wellness.  It all starts with awareness.  To that end, as a television producer, I feel a new calling to use my gifts and talents to produce a new kind of reality show.  

The Kindness Effect will be a 30-minute, hidden camera, reality program with a unique twist.  Similar in format to programs like Candid Camera; Betty White’s Off Their Rockers; and Punk’d with one major difference.  Instead of using the programming budget to play practical jokes on people, The Kindness Effect will “prank” people “for good” and change lives along the way.  Learn more here.

The gift of giving is not only something you give others, but something you give yourself.  It is no cliché. It is actually good for your health.  My journey in finding this truth was a difficult but extremely rewarding and enlightening breakthrough in my own life.  I hope you, too, find healing through giving and that the act of giving is a gift you give yourself this holiday season.


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Video Marketing: Putting You on the Tube

So far, in our video marketing article series, we talked about why video is a choice medium for sharing your message and how video appeals to the senses and the masses in helping you build a sticky brand. That’s our perspective. We produce videos. Of course we will continue to tout the benefits!

iStock_000015898585Small

Share Your Message in Video

What about our customers? Why do they choose to earmark precious marketing dollars to video production and what exactly are they having us write and produce? Ah, the inspiration of this article. More justification for video! Why and How our customers are utilizing video and the top three reasons you should, too.

When it comes to why, though we hear a lot of variations to this answer, we find they can all be boiled down to the following three key reasons.

Why Customers Use Video Marketing….

 # 1  “I have important things to tell people.”  

When you have something really important to communicate, say it in video. Video gives your message time to think before it speaks. The simple act of writing a script and crafting the precise language is a valuable exercise in and of itself. The script requires you to hone and sharpen your message until it is clear and concise, and can be readily understood by your audience.

Once the script copy is polished, matching the words with eloquent visuals will make that message come to life and, once on tape or in digital format, the master program ensures that message is delivered perfectly every time.

# 2  “I want to stand out from the crowd.”

If you want to stand out in a forest, don’t wear camouflage. If you want to be found, wear something fluorescent.  The same is true in marketing – it’s all about differentiation. Video allows you to communicate the unique properties of your brand to encourage consumers to choose you over your competitor.

Those “unique properties” become the identifiers of your brand, allowing consumers to identify you without a second thought, or brand awareness. Awareness is the first phase in the buying process, which can lead to brand loyalty and hopefully – provided you deliver on that message – a lifetime of happy customers (and their referrals).

# 3  “I want our company to have a prominent online presence.” 

Bottom line, you want your message where your consumers are – online. Video takes your messaging and makes it visual and sharable, which is appealing for our digital culture of consumers. While video can be shared through traditional means such as DVD’s, having an online presence with a video can instantaneously reach a large amount of customers and prospects with just a click.

Now that we established the “why” from a businesses point of view, we can shed light on the ever looming “how” that turns theory into motion, literally. While this list is in no way all-inclusive, it can get your wheels turning as to the functional uses of video.

How to use video in your marketing efforts….

Commercials, Infomercials, Marketing Videos…

The most widely recognized use of video is promotional. Business-to-consumer (B2C) promotion is a saturated market, so it is more important than ever to differentiate your brand through effective video and strategic messaging/imagery. Business-to-business (B2B) promotion also falls in this category; if you sell a product or service that helps other companies deliver their final product or service. Video, in this situation, can take a proposal or sales pitch to the next level.

Educational and Training…

While we often focus on the added value video can have on your marketing strategy − video can be purely internal. Use video to spice up meetings, to unveil new product releases or changes to the website. Save money and increase the efficiency of employee time by using video to train new employees or existing staff members on protocol changes or updated safety regulations. Video also makes employee training more flexible, allowing the person to go at his or her own pace and approach the content more thoroughly.

From a human resources perspective, video allows for recordable evidence that training has been provided and fully covered all issues. While this may seem minor at first glance, proper training is an important preventative measure against lawsuits and workplace malpractice claims.

Public Relations Efforts…

As the age of digital media continues to emerge, video news releases are more prominent than ever. Members of the media tend to prefer audiovisual content to the traditional press release style. With video, your words pack more punch and will better grab the attention of your intended audience.

Public service announcements (PSA) are another public relations tactic that translates effectively through video. Many times, PSA’s address more serious issues than typical press release and the serious tone is easily captured through the power of video. Product recalls and public apologies are often transmitted through PSAs.

Investor relations…

Maintaining positive investor relations is an important part of your company’s success. Video provides an avenue to communicate important information to investors in a sophisticated format that subconsciously communicates organization and sophistication. Video also allows you to capture and maintain their interest by providing visuals to support your numbers. You can also show your appreciation for their vested interest by using top company executives to communicate the information, showing them how much you value their investments from the top-down.

Creative brand building…

When creating and sustaining a recognized brand, you can’t be all business all the time. You have to find a way to be personable with current and prospective customers, which can be achieved in many ways. Philanthropy is one way to meet this goal and benefit others. Partnerships with charities and videos to promote that organization’s cause and your work with them are a great way to give your brand character. You can create awareness for a cause and your brand at the same time, without being too conspicuous.

Social media campaigns supplemented by video are another example of creative brand building. Engaging online followers to use a specific hash tag (#) on Twitter or post their own content to your Facebook wall allows company’s to make personal connections with their more important audiences. Kick off the campaign or program with a video getting viewers excited about participation.

Videos can, but do not have to be, completely calculated. While you always want a consistent message, videos can take chances and show the fun side of your organization. When posting sharable video content online, you touch on the concept of viral video. While this is considered a bit passé’ in the world of social media, there is definitely some merit to creating short, fun or meaningful videos that make people want to share across their internet presence.

Documentaries and docudramas are less recognized in the business world, but can provide historical value to your organization. Identifying important milestones can create an emotional connection to viewers that sparks interest in your product or service, thus building brand awareness.

Throughout the series, we established the what, when, where and why of video in a business environment. Don’t miss article one: Moving Messages in the Right Direction or article two: Appealing to the Senses. Appealing to the Masses.